Profile

resqgeek: (Default)
ResQgeek

July 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
9101112 131415
1617 1819202122
2324 2526272829
3031     

Custom Text

Most Popular Tags

Jun. 15th, 2017

København

Jun. 15th, 2017 08:36 am
resqgeek: (Default)
I was simply charmed by Copenhagen (København to the locals). This is a capital signal that has a laid-back feel that I haven't found to be the case in other cities. It is an old city, with all the grace that often accompanies deeply historical places, but at the same time, this is also a thoroughly modern city, with a convenient, clean, and efficient transportation network that functions well in conjunction with the widespread use of bicycles.  Even as a newly arrived visitor, I found it simple to take advantage of the public transportation options: We used the train to get from the airport to our hotel, the train and bus to get from the hotel to the cruise port, and the bus and metro to get from the cruise port beck to the airport. The prices were reasonable, the connections easy to figure out, and the schedule reliable. We did all of this for less than the cost of a single taxi ride. Coming from the Washington, DC area, where our public transit system has been in crisis mode for the last few years and seems in danger of becoming utterly useless, it was refreshing to take advantage of such a well planned and maintained system.

As I was writing my initial entry about our arrival in Copenhagen, my wife was taking a nap.  Shortly after I posted that entry, she woke up and we ventured back out into the city for a couple more hours.  We walked along the water towards the old fort at the north end of the old part of the city. We weren't really looking for any specific landmarks, but simply enjoying the evening in a new city. Eventually, we discovered the Little Mermaid statue, one of the iconic tourist spots in this hometown of Hans Christian Anderson. Because it was late evening on a weekday, and because there was a concert elsewhere in the city as part of an ongoing music festival, the normal crowds that make this a difficult spot to visit were not in evidence, and we could linger to get photos from different angles, and appreciate the setting, on the edge of the harbor.

The Little Mermaid

We then began our walk back towards our hotel, exiting the castle area through the Churchillparken. We admired the handsome St. Alban's Anglican church here, and found a bust of Winston Churchill.  This is also the future site of a museum dedicated to the Danish resistance during WWII. This museum is being built underground (fittingly), and, from the descriptions on the signs we saw, sounds like something I will want to return someday to visit.

During our all day tour of the city on our second day here, we got a terrific overview of the city, as well as an introduction to the history.  We visited the Christianborg Palace, once home to the royal family but now serving to house Parliament, as well as Amalienborg Palace, the current home of the Danish Queen, as well as the Crown Prince and Princess. At each of these locations, I was struck by the lack of a security perimeter...In each case, the streets were open to the public right up to the buildings, and there was very little visible security presence. Granted, the ceremonial guards at Amalienborg were carrying very modern and functional rifles, and I have no doubt that each location is thoroughly covered by video surveillance, but the contrast to the bunker-style security we have put into place in Washington, DC, was stark.

Over our two days here, we saw a great deal, walking miles through the maze of streets that make up the old part of the city. Clearly, we didn't see everything that there was to see, but it was a satisfying visit, leaving me very impressed with the city and its people. I certainly hope that I'll be able to return someday so that I can spend some time exploring the many museums that fill the city.
 On the first full day of our cruise, which was our only day at sea as we sailed north along the Norwegian coast, we witnessed our third major emergency operation of the trip.  Shortly before midday, we returned to our stateroom to pick up some things and noticed the sound of a helicopter flying nearby. Almost as soon as that sound registered, there was an announcement on the public address system requesting the stretcher team to report to the ship's hospital. I stepped out onto our balcony and discovered that the Norwegian rescue helicopter was directly above our cabin!

I quickly grabbed my camera, and began to take photos as we watched a member of the helicopter crew prepare to repel down to the ship. Once he was on deck, they lowered a basket down, and the helicopter moved out next the ship while they prepared the patient for the transfer.  Over the next 15-20 minutes the helicopter appeared to remain perfectly stationary relative to the ship. But since the ship was still moving, this meant that the helicopter was actually station-keeping, moving at exactly the same speed as the ship. That pilot did a truly impressive job of flying the helicopter.



Eventually, the helicopter moved back over the ship and the patient and crew member were hoisted aboard.  When the aircraft moved alongside again, the crew was sliding the side door closed and the helicopter accelerated ahead of the ship before crossing in front of us towards the Norwegian shore. It was a very professional and skilled operation. I have no idea what the condition of the patient might have been, but we weren't scheduled to arrive at a port with a hospital until the third day of the cruise, so I can imagine a number of situations that might have been beyond the ability of the ship's hospital to manage until then.

Afterwards, we talked to others on the ship and discovered that all the outdoor decks of the ship had been closed during the operation, to prevent people from being blown overboard by the rotor wash. That meant that only those with balconies on our side of the ship had a decent chance of witnessing the operation, although everyone on the ship knew it was happening. It was the first time I've been on a cruise when someone needed to be evacuated, and I found the operation fascinating to watch. However, I feel bad for the person whose vacation was so dramatically interrupted, and I hope that they are recovering well.

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags

Style Credit